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Wanted! Better Beetles

Wanted! Better Beetles
Beetles from Uzbekistan are more prolific salt cedar eaters than beetles from Greece. At least that's what Texas Agricultural Experiment Station scientists hope.

Uzbekistan salt cedar beetles being released by the Experiment Station's entomology department are the same species as those released on the salt cedar stands near Lake Meredith. They are just from a different collection point, said Vanessa Carney, Experiment Station entomology........Go to the Animal-science-blog (Added on 6/27/2006 11:58:52 PM)

Greater Snake Danger This Year

Greater Snake Danger This Year
Bob Norris has a rattlesnake named Jake in his office, along with some other slithering companions. Yes, he likes them, but they also serve an educational purpose: it could be a big season in Northern California for these and other poisonous critters. Bob Norris pointed to a bag under the reporter's chair.

"Sure, I've got a rattlesnake with me today I could show you," said Norris, MD, associate professor and director of the division of........Go to the Animal-science-blog (Added on 6/26/2006 7:44:43 PM)

Human-Dolphin Partnership Becomes Protected Area

Human-Dolphin Partnership Becomes Protected Area
The government of Myanmar has established a protected area for, of all things, a partnership between fishermen and a small, gray beakless dolphin with a knack for herding fish into nets, as per the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS). Specifically, some 70 kilometers of the Ayeyarwady River have been protected to safeguard the cooperative fishery. It also supports one third of the river's population of Irrawaddy dolphins, a species that is........Go to the Plant-science-blog (Added on 6/22/2006 9:27:45 PM)

Hubbard's Fish Anatomy Site

Hubbard's Fish Anatomy Site
Hubbard's fish anatomy site is an excellent site for those who are interested in fishes. Gives detailed accouts of anatomy of fish.The site feature pictures and artilcles.

"I hope that you can learn from these photos that eventhough fish have fundamentally similar structures, there are real differences that permit them to fill their niche and behave the way that they do. Don't forget that these differences are a direct result of at least........Go to the Animal-science-blog (Added on 6/22/2006 7:08:42 PM)

Can Biological Traits Predict Diversification Rates In Birds?

Can Biological Traits Predict Diversification Rates In Birds?
Why do some taxanomic families contain a number of species and others contain far fewer? There has been much debate in the scientific community over the reason for such variation, but a recent study in The American Naturalist by Albert B. Phillimore (Imperial College London, Silwood Park Campus), Robert P. Freckleton (Oxford University), C. David L. Orme (Imperial College London, Silwood Park Campus), and Ian P. F. Owens (Imperial College........Go to the Animal-science-blog (Added on 6/21/2006 12:09:36 AM)

Wildflower Center For College Of Natural Sciences

Wildflower Center For College Of Natural Sciences
The University of Texas Board of Regents today (June 20) authorized the execution of a Memorandum of Intent to make the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center a component of The University of Texas at Austin.

The Executive Committee of the center's board of directors is expected to approve the memorandum on June 21.

Discussions have been under way for some time about a mutually beneficial union between the university and the nonprofit........Go to the Plant-science-blog (Added on 6/20/2006 9:15:58 PM)

Bronx Zoo Sends Gators Home

Bronx Zoo Sends Gators Home
A dozen rare Chinese alligators hatched and raised in the U.S. are about to get in touch with their roots. The toothy twelvesome were donated by Disney's Animal Kingdom, St. Augustine Farm Zoological Park, and the Wildlife Conservation Society's Bronx Zoo for relocation to China.

Beginning their journey at the Bronx Zoo, the alligators took off from New York's JFK airport on May 17, bound for Shanghai. A team of WCS veterinarians oversaw the........Go to the Animal-science-blog (Added on 6/20/2006 8:31:46 PM)

How Dorsophilia genome was sequenced

How Dorsophilia genome was sequenced
In this small and charming book, Won for All, Michael Ashburner gives us a glittering account of the sequencing of the Drosophila genome by a public-private partnership between government-funded laboratories and Celera Genomics. He portrays both the working life and the good life of science, with neat character sketches set off by Lewis Miller's excellent portraits. Michael's flair for detail and inveterate name-dropping, albeit of restaurants........Go to the Animal-science-blog (Added on 6/19/2006 11:56:41 PM)

Arctic Warming And Plight Of Polar Bears

Arctic Warming And Plight Of Polar Bears
A climate scientist at the University of Chicago and 30 of her colleagues from across North America and Europe are urging the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to list the polar bear as a threatened species because global warming is melting its sea-ice habitat.

"As researchers engaged in research on climate change, we are deeply concerned about the effect of Arctic warming on the polar bear habitat," said a letter submitted to the Fish and........Go to the Animal-science-blog (Added on 6/18/2006 6:37:57 PM)

Fossils Depict Aquatic Origins Of Near-modern Birds

Fossils Depict Aquatic Origins Of Near-modern Birds
Five fossil specimens of a near-modern bird found in the Gansu Province of northwestern China show that early birds likely evolved in an aquatic environment, according to a study reported today in the journal Science. Their findings suggest that these early modern birds were much like the ducks or loons found today. Gansus yumenesis, which lived some 105 to 115 million years ago during the Early Cretaceous period, took modern birds through a........Go to the Animal-science-blog (Added on 6/16/2006 12:03:08 AM)

New African Wild Dog Exhibit Opens

New African Wild Dog Exhibit Opens
Grab your binoculars and a wide-brimmed hat for an African safari unlike any other on this side of the Atlantic! The Bronx Zoo's African Plains has grown a lot livelier since a pack of African wild dogs began settling into a new habitat. Just down the trail from our giraffes and around the bend from our cheetahs, the dog pack rounds out this predator-prey exhibit at the heart of the zoo.

The African Wild Dog exhibit features an open field, a........Go to the Animal-science-blog (Added on 6/15/2006 10:27:28 PM)

Paving The Way For Jaguars

Paving The Way For Jaguars
A thoroughfare that's healthy for wildlife? For a change, a conduit through the forests of Central America won't trigger new development or increase greenhouse gases. Instead, conservationists hope, the only thing it will pave the way for is more pawprints. A group of environment ministers representing the seven nations of Central America and Mexico have agreed to establish a network of protected areas and wildlife corridors to safeguard jaguar........Go to the Animal-science-blog (Added on 6/15/2006 9:25:59 PM)

How Leaves Patterns Are Formed

How Leaves Patterns Are Formed
Pick up a leaf and it is hard not to notice the pattern made by the veins. For years, biologists, mathematicians and even poets and philosophers have tried to decipher the rules and regulations behind those varied designs and now new research published in part at the University of Alberta offers a big clue to how those patterns are formed.

"For years people have been trying to understand this beautiful formation," said Dr. Enrico Scarpella,........Go to the Plant-science-blog (Added on 6/15/2006 9:21:54 PM)

Bacteria And Algae Destroy Coral

Bacteria And Algae  Destroy Coral
Scientists have discovered an indirect microbial mechanism whereby bacteria kill coral with the help of algae. Human activities are contributing to the growth of algae on coral reefs, setting the stage for the long-term continued decline of coral.

Reporting in the June 5 on-line version of the scientific journal Ecology Letters, scientists described laboratory experiments on coral and algae.

First author Jennifer Smith, a postdoctoral........Go to the Plant-science-blog (Added on 6/13/2006 12:18:12 AM)

Same Species Responds Differently To Same Warming

Same Species Responds Differently To Same Warming
Based on current trends for both air and water temperatures, by 2100 the body temperatures of California mussels -- found along thousands of miles of coast in the northeast Pacific Ocean and not just in California -- could increase between about 2 degrees F and 6.5 F depending on where they live.

For areas where mussels already are living close to the edge, chances are that increases of 6.5 F will kill them, scientists say.

Unlike humans,........Go to the Animal-science-blog (Added on 6/13/2006 12:01:12 AM)

Evolving Not So Hot

Evolving Not So Hot
Since their discovery in the late 1970s, microorganisms known as archaea have fascinated researchers with their ability to thrive where no other life can - in conditions that are extremely hot, acidic or salty.

In the 1990s, however, researchers discovered that archaea occur widely in more mundane, low-temperature environments such as oceans and lakes. Now, scientists from the University of Georgia and Harvard University find evidence that........Go to the Animal-science-blog (Added on 6/11/2006 12:38:47 PM)

the Pulse of a Gene in Living Cells

the Pulse of a Gene in Living Cells
Scientists at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have observed for the first time that gene expression can occur in the form of discrete "pulses" of gene activity. The researchers used pioneering microscopy techniques, developed by Dr. Robert Singer and colleagues at Einstein, that for the first time allow scientists to directly watch the behavior of a single gene in real time. Their findings appeared in the current........Go to the Animal-science-blog (Added on 6/10/2006 4:57:29 PM)

How Gazelles Adapt To Drought

How Gazelles Adapt To Drought
How do gazelles and other large desert mammals adjust their physiology to survive when food and water are in short supply? A fascinating new study from the July/recent issue of Physiological and Biochemical Zoology reveals that gazelles in the deserts of Saudi Arabia have evolved the ability to shrink oxygen-demanding organs such as the liver and heart, allowing them to breathe less. Fewer breaths reduce the amount of water lost to respiratory........Go to the Animal-science-blog (Added on 6/9/2006 12:11:05 AM)

Brain Region Linked To Fly Slumber

Brain Region Linked To Fly Slumber
Scientists at Northwestern University have pinpointed a brain area in flies that is crucial to sleep, raising interesting speculation over the purpose of sleep and its possible link with learning and memory.

In a paper would be published June 8 by the journal Nature, a team led by Ravi Allada, assistant professor of neurobiology and physiology, shows that the so-called mushroom bodies are essential for sleep regulation in the fruitfly........Go to the Animal-science-blog (Added on 6/8/2006 12:02:20 AM)

More than drought affecting wheat yields

More than drought affecting wheat yields
Wheat producers have more than the drought cutting into their yields this year, said two Texas Agricultural Experiment Station researchers.

Dr. Tom Allen, Experiment Station assistant research scientist and plant disease diagnostician, saw more than 150 wheat samples sent to the Great Plains Diagnostic Network lab this growing season, in addition to 400-plus samples the plant pathology staff gathered across the Panhandle.

Ninety-five........Go to the Plant-science-blog (Added on 6/6/2006 11:48:02 PM)

 

Symbiotic Fungus Does Not Depend On Fungus-farming Ants

Symbiotic Fungus Does Not Depend On Fungus-farming Ants
Fungus-farming ants around the world cultivate essentially the same fungus and are not as critical to the reproduction of the fungi as previously believed, biologists at The University of Texas at Austin have discovered.

Fungus-farming ants are dependent on cultivating fungus gardens for food, and it has been widely believed the fungi also evolved dependence on the ants for their dispersal and reproduction. When young ant queens establish........Go to the Plant-science-blog (Added on 6/28/2006 12:28:17 AM)

Underwater Microscope Finds Biological Treasures

Underwater Microscope Finds Biological Treasures
Researchers towing an underwater digital microscope across the Atlantic have found possible missing links to the global nitrogen cycle, which in turn is linked to ocean productivity.

In a recent report in the journal Science, scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) found abundant colonies of Trichodesmium. The multi-celled, filamentous organism is thought to play a significant role in the input of nitrogen to the........Go to the Animal-science-blog (Added on 6/26/2006 6:47:50 PM)

How Plants Avoid Feeling The Burn

How Plants Avoid Feeling The Burn
Too much sun - for plants as well as people - can be harmful to long-term health. But to avoid the botanical equivalent of "lobster tans," plants have developed an intricate internal defense mechanism, called photoprotection, which acts like sunscreen to ward off the sun's harmful rays.

"We knew that biomolecules called carotenoids participate in this process of photoprotection, but the question has been, how does this work?" said Iris........Go to the Plant-science-blog (Added on 6/22/2006 9:25:07 PM)

Appetite And Limb Development In Frogs

Appetite And Limb Development In Frogs
Leptin, the hormone secreted by fat cells that plays an important role in food intake, has been described for the first time in a cold-blooded vertebrate, the South African clawed frog Xenopus.

As it does in humans and other mammals, leptin acts on the frog brain to suppress appetite. But the hormone also seems to play a role in the complex signaling that turns a finned tadpole into a four-legged frog, as per Robert Denver, an associate........Go to the Animal-science-blog (Added on 6/22/2006 5:53:03 PM)

future of giant panda

future of giant panda
Researchers at Cardiff University, using a novel method to estimate population, have found that there may be a number of more giant pandas remaining in the wild than previously thought.

The giant panda is one of the world's most endangered and elusive species. It is found only in a restricted mountainous region in China with an unusual dietary dependence on bamboos found only in these mountains. This elusive nature has shielded important........Go to the Animal-science-blog (Added on 6/22/2006 5:42:18 PM)

Eavesdropping Fringe-lipped Bats

Eavesdropping Fringe-lipped Bats
Like a diner ordering a dessert based solely on the "oohs" and "aahs" of a customer eating the same dish the next table over, frog-eating bats learn to eat new prey by eavesdropping on their neighbors as they eat, report biologists from The University of Texas at Austin.

Rachel Page and Mike Ryan, studying fringe-lipped bats at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute on Barro Colorado Island in Panama, found that naïve bats quickly........Go to the Animal-science-blog (Added on 6/20/2006 9:13:20 PM)

Showing Off Your Weapons

Showing Off Your Weapons
In a paper from the recent issue of The American Naturalist, Kristopher Lappin (Northern Arizona University), Yoni Brandt (University of Toronto), Jerry Husak (Oklahoma State University), Joe Macedonia (Arizona State University), and Darrell Kemp (James Cook University), demonstrate that a threat display can provide accurate information about the performance of a weapon.

Working at the Wichita Mountains National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma,........Go to the Animal-science-blog (Added on 6/20/2006 8:54:03 PM)

Winged Sharpshooter Eats With Friends

Winged Sharpshooter Eats With Friends
Like a celebrity living on mineral water, the glassy-winged sharpshooter consumes only the dilute sap of woody plants-including grapevines in California , which is feverishly working to prevent the insect's flight into prized vineyards. Now, in a surprising study reported in the June 6 issue of Public Library of Science Biology (PLoS Biology), scientists at The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR), the University of Arizona , and their........Go to the Animal-science-blog (Added on 6/19/2006 11:51:24 PM)

Poison + Water = Hydrogen

Poison + Water = Hydrogen
Take a pot of scalding water, remove all the oxygen, mix in a bit of poisonous carbon monoxide, and add a pinch of hydrogen gas. It sounds like a recipe for a witch's brew. It may be, but it is also the preferred environment for a microbe known as Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans.

In a paper published in the November 27 th issue of PLoS Genetics, a research team led by scientists at The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR) report the........Go to the Plant-science-blog (Added on 6/19/2006 11:44:20 PM)

Orb-weaver spider

Orb-weaver spider
The orb-weaver spiders (family Araneidae) are the familiar builders of spiral wheel-shaped webs often found in gardens, fields and forests. The family is a large one, including over 2800 species in over 160 genera worldwide, making it the third largest family of spiders known (behind Salticidae and Linyphiidae). The oldest known orb-weaving spider is Mesozygiella dunlopi, with specimens in amber dating from the Early Cretaceous.

Generally,........Go to the Animal-science-blog (Added on 6/18/2006 4:39:20 PM)

Fruit Flies Provide Clues To Learning

Fruit Flies Provide Clues To Learning
Scientists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have discovered that a brain region previously known for its role in learning and memory also serves as the location of sleep regulation in fruit flies. Through further examination of this brain structure, scientists hope to shed light on sleep regulation and its role in memory.

Despite its importance in everyday human function, very little is known about the regulation of........Go to the Animal-science-blog (Added on 6/15/2006 11:44:10 PM)

Meet Cesar Millan At The Bronx Zoo

Meet Cesar Millan At The Bronx Zoo
Cesar Millan, host of National Geographic Channel's weekly series, Dog Whisperer, has worked for years with yippy Chihuahuas and bad-mannered bulls. Now he's ready to greet a pack of truly wild dogs, right here at the Bronx Zoo! On June 17, the Dog Whisperer will make a special zoo-call to meet our pack of 20 highly social-and fairly well mannered-African wild dogs. These charismatic canines roam a new open habitat on the zoo's African Plains,........Go to the Animal-science-blog (Added on 6/15/2006 10:23:20 PM)

First-Ever Photo of Wild Rhino on Borneo

First-Ever Photo of Wild Rhino on Borneo
A motion-triggered camera trap set up in a remote jungle has captured the first-ever photo of a rhino in the wild on the island of Borneo, World Wildlife Fund and the Sabah Wildlife Department announced recently.

The rhino is thought to beone of a population of as few as 13 whose existence was confirmed during a field survey last year in the interior forests of Sabah, Malaysia, an area known as the "Heart of Borneo." A handful of rhinos are........Go to the Animal-science-blog (Added on 6/14/2006 11:54:05 PM)

Exinct Animal Captured On Video

Exinct Animal Captured On Video
The first images of a live specimen of a small, furry animal once believed to have gone extinct more than 11 million years ago have been captured during a Southeast Asian expedition led by a retired Florida State University researcher.

The remarkable video and photos shot by David Redfield, a professor emeritus of FSU's science education faculty, and Thai wildlife biologist Uthai Treesucon are being hailed as historic images documenting a........Go to the Animal-science-blog (Added on 6/13/2006 11:27:49 PM)

Rhesus Monkeys In Nepal And Research

Rhesus Monkeys In Nepal And Research
Researchers investigating the genetic makeup of rhesus macaque monkeys, a key species used in biomedical research, have found the rhesus in Nepal may provide a suitable alternative to alleviate a critical shortage of laboratory animals used in work to develop vaccines against diseases such as HIV/AIDS.

Writing in the cover story of the current issue of the American Journal of Primatology, scientists headed by Randall Kyes of the University........Go to the Animal-science-blog (Added on 6/13/2006 12:05:13 AM)

Ant world cup

Ant world cup
It can't be. But in fact it is. Here you see the first World Cup played completely by ants. Japan versus Brazil.

It says the match ended in a draw, which I feel is totally unacceptable. It doesn't say what the score was, either. Shoddy journalism.........Go to the Plant-science-blog (Added on 6/11/2006 9:01:10 AM)

Gardening - When to Prune

Gardening - When to Prune
Pruning that is done by the amateur gardener is carried out to maintain a plant that has been already trained in a nursery. However, a number of keen gardeners grow shrubs and even trees from cuttings and seed, even though it is better to leave a large tree to the experts, because of the special equipment mandatory and the risks involved. The principles that must guide the gardener when he picks up a pair of secateurs should always be 'a well........Go to the Plant-science-blog (Added on 6/10/2006 8:39:48 PM)

Climate Change Is Driving Evolution Of Species

Climate Change Is Driving Evolution Of Species
Rapid climate changes over the past several decades have led to heritable, genetic changes in animals as diverse as squirrels, birds and mosquitoes, as per University of Oregon evolutionary geneticists.

Writing in the "Perspectives" section of the June 9 issue of SCIENCE, William E. Bradshaw, professor of biology, and Christina Holzapfel, biology research associate, show that diverse animal populations have changed genetically in response to........Go to the Animal-science-blog (Added on 6/9/2006 12:37:04 AM)

Sugar Required For Healthy Brain Development

Sugar Required For Healthy Brain Development
New approaches to preventing birth defects from a rare metabolic disorder could result from research completed at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings also may have implications for patients with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's.

To learn more about how glucose affects human development, Mary Carayannopoulos, Ph.D., instructor in pediatrics, developed the first vertebrate model of glucose........Go to the Animal-science-blog (Added on 6/8/2006 7:23:54 PM)

Why Female Birds Boost Up Their Eggs?

Why Female Birds Boost Up Their Eggs?
In a new study reported in the latest issue of Ethology scientists show that female songbirds can alter the size of eggs and possibly the sex of their chicks as per how they perceive their mate's quality.

The scientists played back attractive ("sexy") songs and less attractive control songs of male canaries to female domesticated canaries. When the females started egg-laying they varied the size of their eggs in the nest as per the........Go to the Animal-science-blog (Added on 6/7/2006 11:47:09 PM)

   

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